Ulupono Initiative

Policy

Ulupono Initiative believes transformation can be achieved at a policy level through the support of state and county measures and amendments. We collaborate with likeminded organizations to advocate for policies that will make a meaningful impact in Hawaii.

Bill

Agricultural Loan Revolving Fund; Appropriation

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports SB 352 SD 1, which provides funding for the agricultural loan revolving fund, because it aligns with our goal of creatingmore locally produced food. One major persistent and formidable obstacle to expanding, diversifying, and ensuring the sustainability of Hawai‘i’s local food production is the need for substantial capital investment in agriculture infrastructure, technologies, facilities, agricultural workforce training, and production activities. Yet, our local farmers and ranchers have few options for agricultural financing. The agricultural loan revolving fund is one of the many ways the State has been supportive of agriculture in Hawai‘i over the years.We urge this committee to support continued funding for the revolving fund to help increase local food production.

  • Food

Bill

Agricultural Products; General Excise Tax; Exemption

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 728 HD 1,which adds to the definition of agricultural commodities exempt from the general excise tax,because it aligns with our goal of creatingmore locally produced food.This bill would support our local food producers by making their products more competitive while helpingconsumers by reducingthe cost of locally produced food products consumed in the state. The general excise tax multiplies along the food supply chain, hitting multiple points betweenthe producer and consumer. Therefore, general excise taxes make local food less competitive with imported food products.

  • Food

Bill

Agricultural Theft and Vandalism Pilot Project; Appropriation

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 783 HD 1, which establishes a two-year agricultural theft and vandalism pilot project on Hawai‘i Island, because it aligns with our goal of creatingmore locally produced food.

  • Food

Bill

Agriculture; Food Safety Modernization Act; Income Tax Credit; Special Fund

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports SB 803 SD 2, which provides an income tax credit to farmers for compliance with food safety regulationsand sets up a food safety modernization act special fund, because it aligns with our goal of creatingmore locally produced food.

  • Food

Bill

Agriculture; Increased Local Food Production; Strategic Plan; Department of Agriculture; Governor

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 891 HD 1, which develops a strategic plan to double local food production by 2020, because it aligns with our goal of creating more locally produced food.

  • Food

Bill

Agriculture; Increased Local Food Production; Strategic Plan; Department of Agriculture; Governor; Appropriation

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supportsSB 624 SD 2, which develops a strategic plan to double local food production by 2020, because it aligns with our goal of creating more locally produced food. Ulupono is supportive of the Governor’s plan to double local food production by 2020. However, to meet such an ambitious goal, it is important to have a strategic plan to help the industry, funders, policymakers, and the public. If everyone is using similar metrics and are on the same page, it will help to provide guidance so organizations like Ulupono can be more effective at aligningour actions. We also understand that with so many funding requests to the Legislature, what gets measured gets funded. We hope more metrics and information will help provide momentum at the Legislature for increasing funding for agricultural initiatives.

  • Food

Bill

Audiovisual Technology; Videoconferencing; Legislative Hearings; Testimony; Teleconferencing; Neighbor Islands; LRB Study; Appropriation

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports SB 834 SD 1, which requires both chambers to implement rules to permit residents to presenttestimony through audiovisual technology, because it aligns with our goal of creatingmore locally produced food.

  • Food

Bill

Board of Agriculture

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports GM 810, which approves the confirmation of Vincent Mina to the Board of Agriculture. Vincent Mina has guided the Hawaii Farmers Union United from an emergent grass roots organization into a nationally recognized HFU chapter, with over 1,000 members. Mr. Mina’s consistent leadership to focus on farming as a business and move away from ideological strife has been important in bring agriculture together. This is precisely what is needed at the Board of Agriculture. Under Mr. Mina’s leadership, HFUU joined the Local Food Coalition, which supports all forms of agriculture. Mr. Mina will bring an important voice for small farmers and regenerative agriculture to the Board of Agriculture.

  • Food

Bill

Board of Agriculture

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports GM 811, which approves the confirmation of Randolph Cabral to the Board of Agriculture. Mr. Cabral is a proven agricultural entrepreneur and a long time advocate for farmers in Hawai‘i. Under his leadership, the Hawaii Farm Bureau joined the Local Food Coalition, which supports all forms of agriculture. Mr. Cabral is a perceptive listener and has a deep understanding of the practical needs of farmers. These skill sets are important assets for the Board of Agriculture.

  • Food

Bill

Bona Fide Agricultural Producer Task Force

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports SCR 77, which establishes a task force to define a “bona fide agricultural producer”, because it aligns with our goal of creating more locally produced food.A few generations ago, the vast majority of food consumed was locally produced. However, today, estimates range from 8% to 15% of food consumed is locally produced. When working with stakeholders inside and outside of the agricultural industry to change this drastic loss in market share, we often find support for many local food policies. However, when it comes to the details of crafting legislation and incentives, we often get stuck on the single appropriate definition for a bona fide agricultural producer and this often prevents any actionable progress. The proposed task force is valuable because it will create a commonly recognized definition.

  • Food

Bill

Carbon Farming Task Force; Climate Change; Appropriation

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono supports HB 1578 HD 1 SD 1, which establishes the carbon farming task force, because it aligns with our goals of creating more locally produced food and increasing the production of clean, renewable energy in Hawaiʻi. Ulupono Initiative analyzes both agriculture and renewable energy sectors as part of our mission. In particular, we seek projects that find a common nexus between agriculture and renewable energy.

  • Food
  • Energy

Bill

County Surcharge on State Tax

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono provides comments on SB 1183 SD 2 HD 1, which extends the general excise tax for the Honolulu rail project, because it aligns with our goal of decreasing our dependence on fossil fuels in Hawaiʻi through more efficient transportation modes. In Hawai‘i, while ~20 percent of electricity generation is renewable energy, less than 1 percent of energy use in transportation is renewable. Meanwhile, the transportation sector requires more energy than the electricity sector. Furthermore, about 28 percent of the state’s primary energy usage is due to ground transportation, such as cars and trucks, which rely almost exclusively on imported fossil fuels for its energy. Electrifying ground transportation is presently the most efficient and impactful way to move transportation toward more renewable energy.

  • Energy

Bill

Department of Agriculture; Food Security; Self-sufficiency; Appropriations

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports SB 1313 SD 1, which makes appropriations to implement the increased food security and food self-sufficiency strategy, because it aligns with our goal of creatingmore locally produced food.

  • Food

Bill

Department of Agriculture; Grant; Food Safety; Certification Costs; Special Fund; Appropriation

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 453 HD 1 SD 1, which provides grants to farmers for compliance with food safety regulations, because it aligns with our goal of creating more locally produced food.One of the greatest challenges facing agricultural enterprises over the next few years is getting into compliance with new federal food safety regulations. These new rules are expected to protect public health by providing more information about food production. However, the new regulations are expected to be significantly more strict than the current guidelines, which requires more time and cost for compliance. It is a challenge for our farmers and ranchers to navigate the nuances of the law, track new data requirements, and implement best practices for food safety. Without this funding, farmers and ranchers, particularly smaller scale operations, may be in violation of the law or be forced to shut down, which will jeopardize the future of local agriculture in Hawai‘i.

  • Food

Bill

Department of Agriculture; Qualified Feed Developer Grants; Livestock Revitalization Program; Appropriation

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 483, which provides grants to qualified feed developers via the Department of Agriculture’s Livestock Revitalization Program, because it aligns with our goal of creating more locally produced food.

  • Food

Bill

Department of Agriculture; Qualified Feed Developer Grants; Livestock Revitalization Program; Appropriation; GO Bonds

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports SB 612 SD 2 HD 1, which provides grants to qualified feed developers via the Department of Agriculture’s Livestock Revitalization Program, because it aligns with our goal of creating more locally produced food. Feed is the single largest cost of any animal agriculture operation and currently all feed in Hawai‘i is imported from mainland feed manufacturers such as Cargill, Land O’Lakes feed, Nutreco, and Ewos. Feed costs for livestock production in Hawai‘i can comprise 70 percent of production cost, and our concern is that we need to keep our livestock producers in business.

Bill

Department of Transportation; Renewable Energy; Working Group

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 1580 HD 2 SD 1, which establishes a clean transportation benchmark framework, because it aligns with our goal of increasing the production of clean, renewable energy in Hawaiʻi. In Hawai‘i, while ~20 percent of electricity generation is renewable energy, less than 1 percent of energy use in transportation is renewable. Meanwhile, the transportation sector requires more energy than the electricity sector. Furthermore, about 28 percent of the state’s primary energy usage is due to ground transportation, such as cars and trucks, which rely almost exclusively on imported fossil fuels for its energy. Electrifying ground transportation is presently the most efficient and impactful way to move transportation toward more renewable energy.

  • Energy

Bill

Drought Mitigation; Appropriation

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 630 HD 1, which provides funding for drought mitigation projects, because it aligns with our goal of creating more locally produced food. Hawai‘i’s agricultural industry relies on a constant supply of water, but in times of drought, farmers and ranchers often struggle to keep their businesses alive. In recent years, the state has suffered through severe drought conditions including a two to three decade downward trend in rainfall, which heavily impacts our local agricultural communities. As droughts are increasing, it becomes more important for the Legislature to fund drought mitigation measures to protect our island’s most valuable natural resource.

  • Food

Bill

Electric Vehicles; Places of Public Accommodations; Parking Spaces; Department of Transportation; Task Force

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 793, which establishes fines for parking facility owners that do not provide at least one electrical vehicle charging station for lots with at least 100 parking stalls. In Hawai‘i, while ~20 percent of electricity generation is renewable energy, less than 1 percent of energy use in transportation is renewable. Meanwhile, the transportation sector requires more energy than the electricity sector. Furthermore, about 28 percent of the state’s primary energy usage is due to ground transportation, such as cars and trucks, which rely almost exclusively on imported fossil fuels for its energy. Electrifying ground transportation is presently the most efficient and impactful way to move transportation toward more renewable energy. This bill would create greater demand for electric vehicle charging infrastructure, a precursor to making electric vehicle ownership more appealing by reducing range anxiety. More electric vehicle charging stations would have the additional benefit of the potential to add battery storage capacity and/or demand response capacity to the electric grid.

  • Energy

Bill

Energy Efficiency; Working Group

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 1249 HD 3, which discloses typical monthly operating costs for all new home sales and establishes an energy efficiency working group, because it aligns with our goal of increasing the production of clean, renewable energy in Hawaiʻi.

  • Energy

Bill

Energy Storage Income Tax Credit

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono opposes SB 365, which creates tax credits for energy storage, because it is too  costly for the State. Our financial analysis, based on the projections of new solar in the Hawaiian Electric Companies’ most recent Power Supply Improvement Plans provides an indication of the total net cost exposure (incomplete because it does not cover Kaua‘i). One of the biggest impacts to the State’s budget is the usage of this credit by residential or commercial customers. Greater residential adoption would increase the fiscal deficit to the State because currently many residential customers use the existing tax credit in full. 

  • Energy

Bill

Energy Storage System Tax Credit

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono provides comments on SB 361, which creates tax credits for energy storage,and has caps and minimum scale.While we prefer SB 665, this bill has several positive elements.

  • Energy

Bill

Environmental Quality Control

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono supports HCR 120HD 1, which applies consistent standards to all applicantsfor environmental reviews, because it aligns with our goal of creating more locally produced food, and more importantly, preserves the intent of the act for public disclosure in regulatory decision making while ensuring that responsible economic development can still more forward.

  • Energy

Bill

General Obligation Bonds; Seawater Air Conditioning

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 516, which authorizes the issuance of general obligation bonds for seawater air conditioning facilities, because it aligns with our goal of increasing the production of clean, renewable energy in Hawaiʻi. As Hawaiʻi’s energy issues become more complex and challenging, we appreciate this committee’s efforts to look at policies that support renewable energy production.

  • Energy

Bill

General Obligation Bonds; Seawater Air Conditioning

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports SB 1057, which authorizes the issuance of general obligation bonds for seawater air conditioning facilities, because it aligns with our goal of increasing the production of clean, renewable energy in Hawaiʻi. As Hawaiʻi’s energy issues become more complex and challenging, we appreciate this committee’s efforts to look at policiesthatsupport renewable energy production.

  • Energy

Bill

Green Infrastructure Authority; PUC; Loan Program; Clean Energy Savings; Energy Storage System Rebate Pilot Program; Appropriation ($)

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono opposes HB 1593, which establishes an energy storage system rebate programusing bond funding from the Hawai‘i Green Energy Market Securitization (GEMS) program.While Ulupono believes that an energy storage incentive needs to be established to meetthe State’s 100 percent renewable portfolio standard goal, there are more effective andprudent ways to implement the intent than the proposed rebate program. The greeninfrastructure special fund was established in June 2013 to provide low-cost financing forenergy technology to ensure all ratepayers receive an opportunity for affordable cleanenergy. The rebate program complicates the repayment of the green infrastructure bonds,as there is no direct revenue-generating component from the rebate. Ulupono further feelsthat funding for energy programs will continue to be available and replenished if aneffective loan program is implemented.Ulupono opposes HB 1593, which establishes an energy storage system rebate program using bond funding from the Hawai‘i Green Energy Market Securitization (GEMS) program. While Ulupono believes that an energy storage incentive needs to be established to meet the State’s 100 percent renewable portfolio standard goal, there are more effective and prudent ways to implement the intent than the proposed rebate program. The green infrastructure special fund was established in June 2013 to provide low-cost financing for energy technology to ensure all ratepayers receive an opportunity for affordable clean energy. The rebate program complicates the repayment of the green infrastructure bonds, as there is no direct revenue-generating component from the rebate. Ulupono further feels that funding for energy programs will continue to be available and replenished if an effective loan program is implemented.

  • Energy

Bill

Green Infrastructure Loan Program; Re-direction

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono opposes SB 1310, which seeks to expedite disbursement of funds for utility scale renewable energy or storage projects and then close the Green infrastructure loan program.The green infrastructure special fund was established in June 2013 to provide low-cost financing for energy technology to ensure all ratepayers receive an opportunity for affordable clean energy. However, it is important to keep in mind that the green energy market securitization program (GEMS) program has only been operational for a year and a half. Furthermore, GEMS’s loan programs were severely impeded when the PUC changed the rules to restrict Net Energy Metering for rooftop solar.

  • Energy

Bill

Hawaii Advisory Council on Emergency Management

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports GM 733, which approves the confirmation of William Anonsen to the Hawai‘i Advisory Council on Emergency Management. William Anonsen has served on the Hawai‘i Advisory Council on Emergency Management for six years including four years as the chairman. He has forty years experience in the maritime industry including the Merchant Marines, port operations, and the tourism industry. Given how vital our maritime connections are to the safety and resiliency of our State, we believe William Anonsen would be an excellent choice to continue to chair the Hawai‘i Advisory Council on Emergency Management.

  • Energy

Bill

Important Agricultural Lands; Counties; Land Use Commission; Appropriations; Tax Credit

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono supports HB 1584 HD 2 SD 1, which helps to speed up designation of important agricultural lands, because it aligns with our goal of creating more locally produced food. The Important Agricultural Lands designation is one of the policies that helps to keep agricultural land in agriculture, especially as development grows. This bill will help designate key lands for agriculture. Once designated, agricultural operations on important agricultural lands are eligible for favorable benefits and regulations. Greater clarity on Important Agricultural Lands will help provide expanded opportunities for farmers and ranchers to obtain access to high quality land at affordable rates by protecting such land from development. The cost and availability of high quality land is a critical requirement for the success of local agriculture.

  • Food

Bill

Interisland Transmission System; Repeal

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono opposes SB 376 SD 1 HD 1, which removes references to the interisland undersea transmission cable from the Hawai‘i Revised Statutes.Ulupono is very supportive of the State’s 100 percent renewable portfolio standard by 2045. Yet, one of the challenges that developers, the utility, and regulators must face to accomplish this mission is O‘ahu has a higher relative demand for electricity with less renewable energy potential, while the reverse is true on the neighbor islands. One potential solution is to interconnect the different islands’ grids via an undersea cable to match supply and demand. The latest version of the utility’s Power Supply Improvement Plan shows that an interisland undersea cable is the least cost option to achieve 100 percent renewable energy.

  • Energy

Bill

Maui County Package; Important Agricultural Lands; Counties; Grants-in-Aid; Appropriation

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono supportsSB 481, which provides grants to the counties for identifying and mapping important agricultural lands because it aligns with our goal of creatingmore locally produced food. The Important Agricultural Lands designation is one of the policiesthat helps to keep agricultural land in agriculture, especially as development grows.This funding will help counties to designate key lands for agriculture. Once designated, agricultural operations on important agricultural lands are eligible for favorable benefits and regulations. Greater clarity on Important Agricultural Lands willhelpprovide expanded opportunities for farmersandranchers to obtainaccess to high quality land at affordable rates by protecting such land from development. The cost and availability of high quality land is a critical requirement for the success of local agriculture.

  • Food

Bill

One Hundred Percent Renewable Energy Economy; Clean Energy Initiative Program; Target Date

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports SCR 123, which requests the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism to establish a target date of 2045 for the reduction of imported fossil fuels for the electricity and ground transportation sectors, because it aligns with our goal of increasing the production of clean, renewable energy in Hawaiʻi. In Hawai‘i, while ~20 percent of electricity generation is renewable energy, less than 1 percent of energy use in transportation is renewable. Meanwhile, the transportation sector requires more energy than the electricity sector. Furthermore, about 28 percent of the state’s primary energy usage is due to ground transportation, such as cars and trucks, which rely almost exclusively on imported fossil fuels for its energy. Electrifying ground transportation is presently the most efficient and impactful way to move transportation toward more renewable energy.

  • Energy

Bill

Public Schools; Heat Abatement; Hawaii Green Infrastructure Special Fund; Appropriation

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 957 HD 1 SD 1, which authorizes the Hawai‘i Department of Education (DOE) to borrow moneys from the Hawai‘i Green Energy Market Securitization (GEMS) loan program for heat abatement in Hawai‘i’s public schools, because it aligns with our goal of increasing the production of clean, renewable energy in Hawaiʻi.The green infrastructure special fund was established in June 2013 to provide low-cost financing for energy technology to ensure all ratepayers receive an opportunity for affordable clean energy. However, it is important to keep in mind that the GEMS program has only been operational for a year and a half. Furthermore, GEMS’s loan programs were severely impeded when the PUC changed the rules to restrict Net Energy Metering for rooftop solar.

  • Energy

Bill

Public Utilities Commission; Audit

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono supports with comments SB 382 SD 2 HD 1, which updates the Public Utilities Commission structure and operations. Ulupono supports the overall intent of this bill, which is to improve Public Utility Commission effectiveness and transparency. While we understand that a management audit can reveal opportunities for improvement, there are specific actions that were in SB 382 SD 2 that can be taken now.

  • Energy

Bill

Public Utilities Commission; Merger

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 1566 HD 1, which establishes a substantial net benefit as the Public Utilities Commission’s standard for a transfer or assignment of an electric utility.This bill is critically important to ensure the specious arguments made by HECO and NextEra that the criteria for public interest in “no net harm” will never again recur and that the correct standard is “substantial net benefits”.

  • Energy

Bill

Renewable Energy; Microgrid Demonstration Projects

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 1248 HD 2, which authorizes the establishment of microgrid demonstration projects because it aligns with our goal of increasing the production of clean, renewable energy in Hawaiʻi.Renewable energy innovation is needed to achieve the state’s ambitious goal of 100 percent clean energy by 2045. Microgrid projects can provide communities and organizations with a faster path for incorporating renewable energy production and storage projects. Microgrids provide each island’s system with greater resilience because these grids are able to separate from the electricity grid if it fails and then help restart the grid. While the Department of Defense’s microgrids help play this role today, additional microgrids on the civilian side would augment system security for all. For businesses that rely upon a continuous supply of electricity from a microgrid, such as hospitals and hotels, certain microgrids need to sell their power to those businesses without being considered a public utility.

  • Energy

Bill

Renewable Energy; Solar and Wind Energy Property; Tax Credit; State Building Design; Energy Efficiency; Appropriation

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono supports SB 665, which replaces the renewable energy systems tax credit with tax credits for energy storage, because it aligns with our goal of increasing the production of clean, renewable energy in Hawaiʻi.

  • Energy

Bill

Renewable Portfolio Standard

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 903, which fixes the renewable portfolio standard for electrical energy by removing the double count from the formula. Under the current definition, the double counting of renewable distributed energy resources by using “sales” instead of “generation” in the denominator results in the RPS that overstates our actual progress. For the 2020 goal of 30 percent, the actual renewable generation as a percentage of total generation is 24 percent. Similarly, for the 2030 RPS goal of 40 percent, the actual renewable generation is 32 percent.  Correcting the formula would save 1.4 MM bbls of oil in 2030—nearly 3percent of total state energy use, or the equivalent of adding more than 400 MW of solar power to the grid.

  • Energy

Bill

Solid Waste; Waste-to-Energy

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono supports HB 749 HD 1, which considers waste-to-energy as part of implementing the Hawai‘i Integrated Solid Waste Management Act. In an island state with little land and expensive shipping options, it is often not economical for waste to be re-used or recycled. While Ulupono is supportive of waste source reduction and recycling as the primary waste diversion options, waste-to-energy is a more preferable solution compared to landfilling.

  • Energy

Bill

Special Purpose Revenue Bonds; Nuuanu Managed Aquifer Recharge and Pumped Storage Hydroelectricity

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supportsHB 634HD 1, which authorizes special purpose revenue bonds for upgrading Nuuanu Reservoir #1 for a hydroelectric project, because it aligns with our goal of increasing the production of clean, renewable energy in Hawaiʻi.  Currently, hydroelectric projects exist in all of Hawai‘i’s counties except Honolulu. Hydroelectric power production is highest on Kauai where it provides 7.5 percent of the island’s electricity.

  • Energy

Bill

Special Purpose Revenue Bonds; Nuuanu Managed Aquifer Recharge and Pumped Storage Hydroelectricity

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supportsHB 635HD 1, which authorizes special purpose revenue bonds for upgrading Nuuanu Reservoir #4 for a hydroelectric project, because it aligns with our goal of increasing the production of clean, renewable energy in Hawaiʻi.Currently, hydroelectric projects exist in all of Hawai‘i’s counties except Honolulu. Hydroelectric power production is highest on Kauai where it provides 7.5 percent of the island’s electricity.

  • Energy

Bill

SPRB; Special Purpose Revenue Bonds; Sludge Processing; Renewable Energy; Maui All Natural Alternative, LLC

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 1355, which authorizes the issuance of special purpose revenue bonds to assist Maui All Natural Alternative, LLC (MANA) with the development of a project to provide municipal sludge processing and renewable energy at the Wailuku-Kahului wastewater reclamation facility on Maui. This is a public purpose project that combines beneficial use of municipal sludge, demonstrates on a commercial scale, firm renewable energy produced from energy crops harvested on Maui, and promotes environmental sustainability and agricultural diversification on former plantation lands. It will help provide pathways for larger scale agriculture in Hawai‘i, which is needed due tothe departure of pineapple and sugar plantations in our state’s recent history. This project, which will continue to be funded through private sources, helps to address many of thestate’s and counties’ sustainability goals.

  • Energy

Bill

SPRB; Special Purpose Revenue Bonds; Sludge Processing; Renewable Energy; Maui All Natural Alternative, LLC ($)

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports SB 1104, which authorizes the issuance of special purpose revenue bonds to assist Maui All Natural Alternative, LLC (MANA) with the development of a project to provide municipal sludge processing and renewable energy at the Wailuku-Kahului wastewater reclamation facility on Maui. This is a public purpose project that combines beneficial use of municipal sludge, demonstrates on a commercial scale, firm renewable energy produced from energy crops harvested on Maui, and promotes environmental sustainability and agricultural diversification on former plantation lands. It will help provide pathways for larger scale agriculture in Hawai‘i, which is needed due tothe departure of pineapple and sugar plantations in our state’s recent history. This project, which will continue to be funded through private sources, helps to address many of thestate’s and counties’ sustainability goals.

  • Waste

Bill

University of Hawaii; Green Special Fund; Appropriation

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 794 HD 1 SD 1, which establishes the University of Hawai‘i Green Special Fund to fund energy conservation measures, because it aligns with our goal of increasing the production of clean, renewable energy in Hawaiʻi. The University of Hawai‘i is one of the largest consumers of electricity for the utility and therefore could be one of the most impactful and effective organizations in utilizing energy efficiency projects. Increased energy efficiency funding will help to reduce the long-term costs of operating and maintaining University infrastructure. If the University of Hawai‘i is able to implement increased energy efficiency measures, this will further help meet our state’s goal of 100 percent renewable energy, of which 30 percent is energy efficiency.

  • Energy

Bill

Water Conservation Rebate Program; County Water Supply Departments; Appropriation

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 636 HD 1 SD 1, which provides funding for water conservation for county owned public water systems, because it aligns with our goal of creating more locally produced food. Hawai‘i’s agricultural industry relies on a constant supply of water, but in times of drought, farmers and ranchers often struggle to keep their businesses alive. In recent years, the state has suffered through severe drought conditions including a two to three decade downward trend in rainfall, which heavily impacts our local agricultural communities. As droughts are increasing, it becomes more important for the Legislature to fund water conservation measures to protect our island’s most valuable natural resource.

  • Energy

Bill

Water Conservation Rebate Program; County Water Supply Departments; Appropriation

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 635 HD 1, which authorizes special purpose revenue bonds for upgrading Nuuanu Reservoir #4 for a hydroelectric project, because it aligns with our goal of increasing the production of clean, renewable energy in Hawaiʻi. Currently, hydroelectric projects exist in all of Hawai‘i’s counties except Honolulu. Hydroelectric power production is highest on Kauai where it provides 7.5 percent of the island’s electricity.

  • Energy

Bill

Water Infrastructure Loans; Water Infrastructure Loan Program

2017 Hawaii Legislative Session

Ulupono strongly supports HB 632 HD 1 SD 1, which allows loans to water utilities, because it aligns with our goal of creating more locally produced food. Hawai‘i’s agricultural industry relies on a constant supply of water, but in times of drought, farmers and ranchers often struggle to keep their businesses alive. In recent years, the state has suffered through severe drought conditions including a two to three decade downward trend in rainfall, which heavily impacts our local agricultural communities. As droughts are increasing, it becomes more important for managers of water to have the financing ability to develop water infrastructure to protect our island’s most valuable natural resource.

  • Energy